Games Industry

Antichamber developer explains why marketing may be an indie’s most important skill

Antichamber developer explains why marketing may be an indie’s most important skill

The majority of developers contact the press for the first time once their games has been released. Every day there are at least a dozen pleas for coverage of someone's game, and the hook is usually simply that it has been released.

This article elegantly explains why learning how to market your game is so important, and how that skill set can make the difference between a game that's a hit, and obscurity. Many creative people think that simply creating a great game is enough, and in some rare cases it certainly is, but that's not anything you want to risk when you've sunk a large amount of money and years of your time into a project.

Colin Walsh, the man behind the now-Greenlit game Drifter, once asked me if I'd be willing to meet him at GDC to take a look at an early version of the game. We sat down at a table, and he walked me through what he wanted to do while I flew a ship around a starfield.

The Kickstarter and Greenlight campaign for the game were a long way off, but he just wanted to talk about the game, prove to me it was real, and explain in person why it was interesting. When my phone rang later and he asked about coverage, I was 100 percent more receptive due to the seeds he planted that day.

Making the game is 50 percent of the struggle. Learning how to get the word out is the other 90 percent.