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Cries of joy: DmC on PC doubles the framerate and improves textures for one hell of an experience

Cries of joy: DmC on PC doubles the framerate and improves textures for one hell of an experience

DmC: Devil May Cry

  • PC

$49.99 MSRP

Buy Game

A major gripe among some Devil May Cry fans has been the framerate dip – 30 frames per second, down from the 60 fps of earlier entries. While both the 360 and PS3 versions of Ninja Theory’s DmC run at 30 fps, as long as you have the hardware, the PC version of the game runs at a crisp 60 fps. It also packs a couple of other nice surprises to reward PC gamers who are willing to wait until the 25th to play the game.

Before we go into any further detail, here are the minimum and recommended PC specs to run DmC:

Minimum System Requirements:
  • OS: Windows Vista/XP, Windows 7, Windows 8
  • Processor: AMD Athlon X2 2.8 Ghz or better, Intel Core2 Duo 2.4 Ghz or better
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Hard Disk Space: 8 GB free hard drive space
  • Video Card: ATI Radeon HD 3850 or better, NVIDIA GeForce 8800GTS or better
  • DirectX: 9.0c or greater
  • Sound: Standard audio device

Recommended System Requirements:
  • OS: Windows Vista/XP, Windows 7, Windows 8
  • Processor: AMD Phenom II X4 3 Ghz or better, Intel Core2 Quad 2.7 Ghz or better
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Hard Disk Space: 9 GB free hard drive space
  • Video Card: AMD Radeon HD 6950 or better
  • DirectX: 9.0c or greater
  • Sound: Standard audio device

My desktop PC has an Intel i5-3550 processor, 16 GB of RAM, and an Nvidia Geforce 680 GTX. I installed the game onto a 256 GB solid state drive.

The PC version is not without its hiccups though, even when run on a machine with specs that exceed the recommended hardware.

There is a large amount of screen tearing during cut scenes. It’s never so bad that it’s detrimental to the game’s enjoyability, but it is noticeable. No problems occurred in slower-paced scenes where characters stand-off or speak to one another, but if too much started happening at once, the top and bottom edges of the screen gave way. In the early half of the game, Dante has flashbacks/out-of-body experiences which involve the camera traveling down a swirling, magic-looking tunnel. These tunnel trips were the biggest offenders.

Double the frames, double the fun

There were no such problems during normal game play, no matter how frantic things got. There’s little comparison after playing both the PC version of the game and testing it on the PS3: doubling the frame rate leads to a smoother, more enjoyable experience. You’ll also notice a more responsive experience, which is a nice boost in a game that’s so dependent on timing and rhythm for its combat.

Yet, it may not be the boosted framerate that gives the PC version of DmC the biggest advantage over its console siblings. While the console versions of DmC are perfectly fine – this is a game worth buying, no matter what system you play on – the PC version benefits from higher-resolution textures, better shadows, and allows for a greater draw distance. The level of clarity on PC versus PS3 was palpable; if you’ve seen the differences between games like Dishonored or Borderlands 2 on PC, you’ll know what I mean.

One quick note: you’ll want a console-style controller. You can play this game with a mouse and keyboard, but you’re not going to enjoy it as much. This is the sort of game that was built with a controller in mind.

So worth it

I won’t re-tread what Ben has already said about the game in his review; it’s fantastic, with a smart, well-developed cast and fun writing. The combat system isn’t as deep as, say, Devil May Cry 3, but it’s still miles above most, the worlds are vivid, imaginative, and colorful, and the story here is exceptional from writing to delivery.

It isn’t the campy, silly Dante you remember, but then again, Nolan’s Batman didn’t fight villains with puns like his previous incarnations, and those films turned out alright.

This is a damn good game no matter what system you choose to play it on, no matter if you’re a fan or newcomer. But if you’re wondering which version of the game to pick up and if your PC can handle it, hold out for a few more days. This version of the game is like Dante’s Devil Trigger: super-charged and cool as hell.