Days of Wonder

Ticket to Ride iPad gets Retina support, and it’s beautiful

Ticket to Ride iPad gets Retina support, and it’s beautiful

The iPad version of Ticket to Ride was updated to take advantage of the Retina display of new iPad hardware, and the results are spectacular. You can take a look at the image inside this story, and make sure to click on the picture to really take in the details. The text is much easier to read, the graphics are sharper, and the added resolution allowed Days of Wonder to add shapes inside the paths so the color blind can play the game as well. We caught up with Days of Wonder CEO Eric Hautemont to discuss how much work went into the upgrade. “There was very little work involved, and a lot less than we had to do for the initial, non Retina-enhanced iPads,” Hautemont said. “Hence the quick turn-around.” The reason is simple: The new display has a high enough resolution, and is high contrast and sharp enough to use the same print files the company uses for the physical board games. “We still sample these files down and tweak them a bit, since we print at 1,200 dpi in the cardboard version, for instance, which would obviously make no sense here,” he explained. Still, the images in the digital game are now the images used in the physical board game. This is as close to the “real” thing as you can get. “When the display is really crisp, like with the new iPad, we like to try and be as close to the real board game as we can,” he explained. “However on lower resolution screens, like old iPads, and the iPhones, even the Retina ones who still have a very small screen form factor, we simplify the graphics from the board game a lot, for readability purposes.” I’ve had a chance to play a few rounds of the game since the update went live, and it really is a beautiful update. The board is clear and easy to read, and the graphics are detailed and attractive. The latest iPad is a luxury product with that new screen and added horsepower needed to run it, but it also allows games like Ticket to Ride, which is the closest you can get to a board game without the physical product in front of you. There are a few assets in the game that don’t seem to be updated and look oddly fuzzy on the screen, but the game delivers where it counts. As we know, digital products are a big part of Days of Wonder's strategy, and ports like this will help keep them ahead of the pack. So what's next? “We'd love to do the same, along with many other long-wished-for improvements, for our other iPad game, Small World,” Hautemont told the Penny Arcade Report. “Hopefully it's only a matter of time.”